How is Agile Changing the Way We Work?

By now, it’s practically accepted that software development and project management, generally, are being re-imagined by agile management techniques. But in a recent article on Projects@Work, called “Agile Drivers,” CST Angela Druckman explains why that is. As she explains, there are six factors that are driving agility in organizations—and they’re changing the way we conceive of doing business. To summarize, the six factors she identifies are:

Getting Down to Business with Games

Over at InfoQ, Deborah Hartmann Preuss reports on the values of games for teaching the principles of Scrum. If youÂ’ve ever attended a Certified ScrumMaster or Product Owner course, chances are your instructor led the group to a deeper understanding of Scrum and agile principles by playing a game or utilizing an interactive exercise. ItÂ’s an effective strategy for communicating difficult-to-grasp ideas in a fun and memorable way and itÂ’s becoming increasingly common for agile education.

Share Your Story

One of the best ways to illustrate how agile and Scrum can transform the way an organization manages its development is through case studies. Rather than simply saying that agile methods will streamline processes, reduce cycle time, and improve product quality, a case study illustrates how agile and Scrum can achieve those things. Moreover, theyÂ’re inspirational. When you can see that someone at another organization has experienced the same challenges and worked through them to successfully implement agile, it gives you the confidence to embark on that journey yourself.

Lean IT

Lately, “Lean”—which derives from the lean manufacturing practices popularized by Honda and Toyota in the 1980s—has been a popular topic in software development circles. Not only does much of agile development have its roots in Lean’s streamlined, waste-averse practices, but Forester just held its Business Technology Forum which focused on the new concept of “Lean IT.”

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Learning by Example

I just saw this post on InfoQ and it struck me as a really valuable offering for the software development community. For agilists, the idea that learning by example is the best way to learn is embedded in such techniques as pair programming, in which an experienced developer “navigates” and a relative newbie “drives.” Well, now Antony Marcano and Andy Palmer’s project PairWithUs translates that idea into a series of documentary-style segments that capture the two as they prog

Lean Software

As IÂ’ve discussed here before, Lean manufacturing, typified by Toyota and HondaÂ’s production system of the 1980s, was one of the most influential precursors to agile development practices. Specifically, LeanÂ’s emphasis on ongoing evaluation of the teamÂ’s performance, constant pursuit of process improvement, and continued waste elimination can be directly observed in agileÂ’s tenets of incremental and iterative inspection and adaptation. Tony Baer, an analyst who covers agile, discussed how Lean has become a hot topic of discussion of late among the agile community.

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How Do We Learn?

Vikas Hazrati filed a fascinating report recently over at InfoQ, in which he discusses an experiment conducted by agilist Steve Bockman. In the experiment, Bockman tasked eight subjects to build a particular kind of paper airplane within a five-minute time box. He then provided three different ways to learn how to construct the airplane: written instructions (i.e. documentation); a completed airplane (i.e. reverse engineering); and step-by-step demonstration (i.e. mentoring).

Thoughts on Agile Transformations

In a recent post at InfoQ, Mike Bria reports on two recent articles by Johanna Rothman which discuss best practices for agile implementation. The right way to go about an agile transformation is a controversial subject, in which some agile practitioners advocate an “all-in” approach to adoption and other recommend a “toe-dipping” strategy. According to Rothman, both approaches are valid, but what matters is the context in which these approaches are applied.